Archive for April, 2016

  • Antiques

    Wanli Pheasant

    Blue & White pheasant head on a Wanli dish.

    Single photo from iPhone with Eyeskey lens.  More details here.

  • Glazes

    Jun

    A Jun glaze on stoneware from the last kiln

  • Uncategorized

    Sashi-ire hana no futami 挿入花の二見

    Images of Japanese flower arrangement from the woodblock-printed book Sashi-ire hana no futami (挿入花の二見) made in 1798 by the amazing Katsushika Hokusai.

    Images generously made available by the British Museum.  I have cropped and adjusted levels of the original scans.  These are full-sized images, right-click to save.

    Two beautiful books of modern Japanese flower arrangement by Kawase Toshiro:

    The Records of Flowers in Four Seasons

    One Day One Flower

  • Uncategorized

    Kawase Hasui

    A wonderfully romantic view of a Japanese pottery.  Link here.  Ukiyo-e.org is an amazing collection of Japanese woodblock prints.

    Kawase Hasui

  • Craft

    Brother Thomas Bezanson

    Brother Thomas Bezanson

    From Creations in Clay, a book of essays and photographs of Brother Thomas Bezanson’s work:

    For many years of my work as a potter I was concerned with learning the skills and technologies proper to the potter’s art.  I was focused on looking back to accomplishments of the past; I was open to those men and women who shaped the tradition of ceramic art.  They were my teachers, by necessity of my ignorance.

    Then at some point in a time out of time they left me standing, so to speak, in a dark forest where their ability to guide me came to an end; there was no longer a path of the past to follow.  There were no paths at all, except the one I was called to make for myself if I did not want to be just another derivative, condemned to repeat the past, or bootleg from the present.

    At this juncture I gradually became aware that my new teacher and best guide was my own work itself.  It led me into myself, into my own inner experience.

    Porcelain vase with copper red glaze

    Wintermoon (Vase)

    Vase

    Hexagonal platter

    Jar with cover

    Tea bowl

  • Photos

    Scanning Test Tiles

    Having purchased a scanner for digitizing my family’s old photos, I had the brilliant idea to also scan glaze test tiles.  I thought I was a genius until Matthew Katz mentioned that he had been scanning tiles for the past ten years.

    Matthew noted that CCD scanners have a greater depth of field, which is great for three-dimensional objects like test tiles.  Because of his recommendation I purchased the Canon 9000F Mark II.

    I’m not a scanner expert and have never calibrated a scanner before.  I already have an X-Rite ColorChecker Classic for photography, and this color card can be used with X-Rite’s i1Profiler (i1Publish) software to create a scanner profile.  Unfortunately, the software license seems to be very expensive.

    I tried Argyll CMS (http://www.argyllcms.com/) but results using the generated ICC profile were worse than the default output.

    Here’s a scan of some test tiles.  I had to adjust the Exposure in Photoshop by about +1 stop.  Notice the reflections on some test tiles that were not flat.

     

    2400dpi scan, 1.3GB TIFF

    Enable large image scans on Canon 9000F Mark II

    The Canon software is really frustrating- by default it wouldn’t let me scan a file greater than a set limit (10208 x 14032 pixels, or larger than 100MB).  I finally found a solution hidden away in the software settings.

    By default, ScanGear won't let you scan images greater than a seemingly arbitrarily set limit.

    1. Open IJ Scan Utility and click Settings

    2. Select ScanGear and check Enable large image scans

    3. ScanGear will now scan files over 100MB. However, you must manually enter dpi greater than 1200, such as 2400, 4800, 9600.

    Comparison with DSLR

    I have a relatively old and cheap Canon EOS Rebel T2i with a 18MP sensor.  In comparison with the Canon 9000F scans, the photos from my camera are smaller.  However, they seem to contain just as much if not more detail and better colors.  If needed I can adjust lighting conditions and camera settings to reduce reflections and adjust exposure.  On the other hand, the scan had some reflections that I could not eliminate.

    It also takes less time for me to take photos than scan at 2400dpi.

    Below are comparisons of the scan and the photos.  In particular, the dark glazes came out very poorly on the scanner.

    Tianmu glaze tile. Canon 9000f Mark II 2400dpi, adjust exposure +1.

    Tianmu glaze tile. Natural light, 18MP EOS Rebel T2i photo

    Ash glaze tile. Canon 9000f Mark II 2400dpi, adjust exposure +1.

    Ash glaze tile. Natural light, 18MP EOS Rebel T2i photo

    Detail of Canon 9000F Mark II scan

    Detail of 18MP EOS Rebel T2i photo

    Conclusion

    In conclusion, while the Canon 9000F is great for scanning old photos and documents, I still haven’t found a way to scan glaze tiles that beats results from my old DSLR.